Rangahau rōpū: Yet another superstar, meet Dave

Dave Burnside was born in Pukekohe to English and Scottish parents. He grew up on the North Shore in Auckland. He has a lived experience of mental distress, addiction and incarceration, spending 37 years in the chaos of addiction and offending. Today Dave is a proud father, with a passion for art, music and the … Continue reading Rangahau rōpū: Yet another superstar, meet Dave

Rangahau rōpū: Meet Jess, our star researcher

Jess was born in Wellington and is of Polish and English descent. She has her own experience of both incarceration and addiction. After leaving prison at the age of 29 years, Jess embarked on studying a degree in Criminology at the University of Auckland. Today Jess celebrates 9.5 years clean and graduated with her degree … Continue reading Rangahau rōpū: Meet Jess, our star researcher

Mahi tahi. What collaborating with us would look like for whānau?

We are keen to collaborate with whānau to create stories about journeys towards whānau ora (wellness and connectedness) and ceasing offending. In this post, we explore what participation in the project would look like. He kohikohinga pūrākau whānau (whānau stories) If you are over 18 years old and have previously experienced incarceration, mental distress and/or … Continue reading Mahi tahi. What collaborating with us would look like for whānau?

Kaiwhakanikoniko. A profile of graphic artist RQ who contributes photos for our mahi

Many of the photos we use on this website are supplied by graphic artist and electronic music producer RQ, AKA Ryan Quinlivan (Ngāti pākehā). Here we share a short story about his art, music and experiences of enhancing his well-being. For over 20 years, Ryan has been observing the landscapes of Aotearoa and capturing their … Continue reading Kaiwhakanikoniko. A profile of graphic artist RQ who contributes photos for our mahi

Rangahau rōpū. Stories about ourselves, beginning with Shane

As a research group we are committed to whanaungatanga, the building and maintenance of connections with whānau and communities. Over the next few weeks we will post stories about ourselves, how we each connect with the project and share our passions for re-envisaging the criminal justice system. Meet Shane White We are starting these stories … Continue reading Rangahau rōpū. Stories about ourselves, beginning with Shane

Kaitautoko. Meet the supporters of our mahi

Our project to re-imagine a different future for people experiencing mental distress and/or addiction in our criminal justice system is supported by the Michael and Suzanne Borrin Foundation. Established through a $38 million bequest by the late Judge Ian Borrin to fund legal research, education, and scholarship, the Foundation believes law is essential to a … Continue reading Kaitautoko. Meet the supporters of our mahi